Poetry Corner Page 2

MY DESIRE FOR YOU

 

                          by  Otto Rene Castillo 

 

 

MY DESIRE FOR YOU COULD BE CALLED A FIERY COLT

BECAUSE IT LEAPS FROM MY EYES

INTO YOUR BODY'S COUNTRYSIDE

 

IT GALLOPS OVER YOU   RESTLESSLY

FOR MINUTES   HOURS   WHOLE CENTURIES

 

WITH ITS HOOVES IT GOES STAMPING

THROUGH THE FOAM OF YOUR SOUL

SO THAT YOU'LL KNOW IT'S THERE

 

BUT DON'T BELIEVE IT  WILD

IF IT PRANCES ACROSS YOUR CHEST

OR STOPS AND REARS UP AT YOU BREASTS' WATERFALL

FROM WHERE YOUR BODY IS FLOWING INTO THE WORLD

INTO THE SEA OF MY HANDS

 

LOOK HOW GENTLE ITS STEP IS

AND THE MIST OF ITS GAIT

AS IT PASSES OVER YOUR BELLY TREMBLING.

 

SEE IT ALSO AT NIGHT   

RESTING ITS MANE ON YOUR THIGHS

AND RAISING ITS EYES   TO THE MOON

WHICH SOFTLY STROKES IT SONOROUS HAIR

 

HEAR IT GALLOPING OVER YOU

WITHOUT EVER KNOWING

WHETHER YOU KNOW IT  AND LOVE IT

SO THAT ITS EPIC WON'T GO UP IN SMOKE

 

MY DESIRE FOR YOU

MY LOVE

STRIDES

THROUGH FIRE

 

Percy Bysshe Shelley  

Ozymandias

       I met a traveler from an antique land

     Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone

     Stand in the desert . . . Near them, on the sand,

     Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,

     And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command

     Tell that its sculptor well those passions read

     Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,

     The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed.

 

     And on the pedestal these words appear:

     "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:

     Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"

 

     Nothing beside remains. Round the decay

     Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare

     The lone and level sands stretch far away.

 

   

(1818)

 Horace Smith

Horace Smith composed this sonnet on 27 December 1817, during an evening

sonnet-writing session with P.B. Shelley:

On a Stupendous Leg of Granite, Discovered Standing by Itself in the Deserts

of Egypt, with the Inscription Inserted Below.

     In Egypt's sandy silence, all alone,

     Stands a gigantic Leg, which far off throws

     The only shadow that the Desert knows.

     "I am great Ozymandias," saith the stone,

     "The King of kings: this mighty city shows

     The wonders of my hand." The city's gone!

     Naught but the leg remaining to disclose

     The sight of that forgotten Babylon.

     We wonder, and some hunter may express

     Wonder like ours, when through the wilderness

     Where London stood, holding the wolf in chase,

     He meets some fragment huge, and stops to guess

     What wonderful, but unrecorded, race

     Once dwelt in that annihilated place.

         Cited by Guy Davenport (of the Univ. of Kentucky) in his

          article "Ozymandias" (on the New York Times op-ed page a

          few years back). Davenport concludes his article:

          "Genius may also be knowing how to title a poem.

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